Trustees

Bikeworks is a social enterprise, legally this means we are a Community Interest Company (CIC). Bikeworks has no shareholders and is governed by our Non-Executive Directors who volunteer their time and commitment as Trustees.

All profits made as a result of our income generating activities are reinvested back into achieving our mission, including the provision of free-to-access inclusive community cycling activities.

Our Trustee Group meets minimum 4-times per year, attending an Organisational Development session once-a-year to review and set the strategy for the year ahead. The Board also establishes ‘task and finish’ groups for new business products and activities throughout the year, as required. 

To facilitate good governance and harness the expertise of our Non-Executive Directors, the Board delegates authority to the Chairs of the Finance and Risk Sub Group, and the People and Governance Sub Group.

  • Carrie-Anne Adams

    Carrie-Anne is our Chair and leads on equality, diversity and inclusion.

    Having been an International Diversity and Inclusion Consultant at Wells Fargo, Carrie-Anne now holds the role of Head of Diversity and Inclusion at Tokio Marine Kiln and was previously a key member of the Equality and Inclusion Team at the London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC).

  • Stephen Bergin

    Stephen leads on finance, and is an active member of the Finance Sub-Group

    Having held a Finance Director role at Refinitiv, previously Thomson Reuters, Stephen brings experience in commercial analysis, strategy, financial control, reporting, pricing and audit, and is now Head of Finance at Trading Hub (Fin-tech).

  • Owen Pearson

    Owen leads on IT

    As a member of the cycling club Tower Hamlets Wheelers, Owen brings lots of community cycling experience, in addition to his skills as Director of Sky Lark Technology. 

  • Lorraine Foley

    Lorraine is Chair of our People and Governance Sub-group

    Having gained extensive experience from working across the health and public sector, including with NHS England and Clinical Commissioning Groups. Lorraine brings skills in operational and strategic planning, including system change.

  • Neil O'toole

    Neil leads on finance, and is an active member of the Finance Sub-Group

    Now retired, Neil continues to share his 30+ years of senior experience from Lloyds Banking Group. With a focus on risk and strategy, Neil is actively involved in supporting other charities, including the Citizens Advice Bureau.

  • John Griffiths

    John is Co-Chair.

    And is the Founder Director of Rocket Science, who provide research, consultancy, and programme management, across government, business and the third sector.

    John is also a Trustee of London Funders.

  • Zoe Portlock

    Zoe is our Co-founder and Co-Chair.

    Zoe Co-founder and previous Chair for 15 years, leads on business development

    With 20+ years of leading and developing charities and social enterprises, having held key senior roles including at the Bromley-by-Bow Centre, Zoe brings governance, partnerships, and business strategy expertise. Having been a lay member for the Imperial College HPRU and a social enterprise mentor for Social Ark, Zoe is also a Trustee at the Carers Centre Tower Hamlets.

OUR TEAM

What’s your role at Bikeworks, what do you do?

I support the small finance team with day to day tasks and financial queries. I provide assistance in maintaining financial records, updating the balance sheet reconciliations and processing invoices and refunds. I also help with drafting and updating budget trackers.

Why is cycling important to you?

Cycling is great for countless reasons: mental health, physical health, a fine form of travel and the general practicality of it. As a non-cycler who’s regularly stuck in London traffic I often find myself envious of cyclists who easily beat the traffic without leaving a  carbon footprint. But now I know I’m in the right place to be able to join them.

What’s your role at Bikeworks, what do you do?

I spend most of my time talking to my colleagues, which is lucky because chatting is one of my favourite pastimes and my team runs such interesting activities, so there’s always loads to talk about! I help organize, streamline and problem solve. Once I’m all talked out, I get my head stuck in spreadsheets and manage processes, policies, reporting and finance.

Why is cycling important to you?

I’m usually more comfortable on feet than wheels! But since working here I’ve found that cycling is more than just ‘riding a bike’; it’s mechanics, education and skills, health and wellbeing, community, inclusion, environmentalism, gender equality and more! I reckon you could pick any topic and find a link to cycling which is pretty cool.

What’s your role at Bikeworks, what do you do?

I run our Employment and Skills Course.  It’s a City and Guilds course and the students also get to do work experience at our fantastic All Ability Bike Club here in the Olympic Park.

Why is cycling important to you?

Being active is really important to me. For a few years, my electric bike was the only comfortable way I could travel after a bad foot injury.  I love that there are so many different cycles now that most people can find one that they can use to get around.  I have a big bike that I use to transport my two young children so we cycle a lot as a family.

What’s your role at Bikeworks, what do you do?

I am the Cycling for Health Project Manager.  I help organise the Cycling for Wellbeing courses which was inspired by the NHS 5 steps to Mental Wellbeing.

Why is cycling important to you?

Cycling is a physical activity that helps me to focus on the present, which is a huge part of positive wellbeing. It is a great way for me to meet new people, help others and join bicycle groups.  Best of all, I get to challenge myself at my own pace. When I learn something new from the amazing Bikeworks instructors, or develop a good cycling habit, I reward myself with purple socks.

What’s your role at Bikeworks, what do you do?

I support the development of innovative ways of using the bicycle for both environmental mode shift to sustainable travel focused on people who are traditionally perceived as less likely, or unable to cycle and social impact, sourcing opportunities to promote inclusive cycling and active travel.

Why is cycling important to you?

I prefer the word cycle instead of bicycle, as it expands people’s thinking outside of a two-wheel experience. I believe that through the power of cycles, another, better world is possible.

What’s your role at Bikeworks, what do you do?

I coordinate our inclusive cycling All Ability Clubs, making sure these run smoothly. This includes welcoming new members and responding to specific enquiries, for example the adjustments we can make using our exciting fleet of specialist bicycles, including hand-cycles and four-wheelers.

Why is cycling important to you?

Cycling should be seen as inclusive; everyone can do it and should be able to access it. There is a great range of adapted cycles for people of all ages, abilities, and experience, riding a bicycle provides so many health benefits.

What’s your role at Bikeworks, what do you do?

My role at Bikeworks is to organise the events from our program and to guarantee the delivery of a smooth process to our customers and staff. The aim beyond this ,is to increase the numbers of Bikeworks’ stakeholders by offering a good service to the general public and that way making us more popular. Bikeworks is a Social Enterprise which offers All Ability sessions free of charge. These activities are funded by the boroughs in order to improve people’s wellbeing by giving the community opportunities to be more active and healthier. In order to make the most of this we are trying to popularise the program and get more people involved. 

Why is cycling important to you?

Particularly for me bicycles are really important, probably one of the most important innovations. The bicycle represents over 400 years of implementing together engineering work, knowledge, materials and technology. Today we have a product which gives a chance to so many people from different ages and abilities to commute and stay active. Almost every person has been involved with cycling at some point in their life. Similar to other well-known industries, the bicycle industry is so popular that it became a reason for other important changes to take place, such as changes in the infrastructure of busy cities or the birth of the motorcycle industry. Cycling is cheap, environmentally friendly alternative transport. Regular cycling may be very beneficial to people’s mental and physical health. In the modern world  we talk about “bicycle culture”. But why cycling, why this in particular? After all, it is probably the feeling when spinning the pedals and feeling the breeze.

What’s your role at Bikeworks, what do you do?

I look after our two Training Centres in East and West London. Here we run everything from one-day maintenance courses up to our more advanced ten-day City and Guilds Level 2 qualifications, as well as a variety of other projects. I also coordinate Dr Bike sessions across London and beyond and support the Comms and Marketing of Bikeworks.

Why is cycling important to you?

Going for a cycle ride is guaranteed to put me in a good mood. It’s great for mental and physical health, the local and wider environment, and it’s cheaper than taking any other form of transport. Cycling can solve so many problems.

What’s your role at Bikeworks, what do you do?

I develop and curate engaging content for social media. This includes posting on social media platforms such as Instagram, Twitter, Facebook etc. which helps to build the Bikeworks brand. 

Why is cycling important to you?

Cycling is important because I feel like it’s a form of therapy. I go cycling when I can and whenever I go it takes your mind off of things and allows you to clear your mind. I’ve also had a new appreciation for Cycling since joining Bikeworks because there was some information that I didn’t know before about cycling.

What’s your role at Bikeworks, what do you do?

I am the Cycle Training Project Manager, organising 1:1 Cycle Training, Family Cycle Training, Balance & Learn to Ride courses, Bikeability courses, Group Cycle Training and a few more projects in various boroughs of London. My role is basically passing on the gift of cycling to any residents learning to ride a bike for the first time or wanting to be more confident on the road. We teach all ages from 3 to 90+. I work with a huge team of wonderful freelance instructors who work relentlessly combining good humour and skills that empower our communities.

Why is cycling important to you?

Since rescuing an unloved bike 20 years ago, my perception of London has radically changed. From cycling around my local East London area to reaching Paris or Amsterdam, this bike has given me so much joy, fitness and freedom. Everyone should have access to cycling. It’s good for your mood, it’s good for the environment and it’s fantastic for your wellbeing. Have you taken your cycle training lesson yet? Go on then!

What’s your role at Bikeworks, what do you do?

I lead the team, come up with new ideas, nurture relationships and build networks, all to provide people and communities with access to the opportunity of using the bicycle for social and environmental good.

Why is cycling important to you?

Incredibly it’s not changed since it was originally created 150 years ago. Through my own life I have discovered so many ways to use the bicycle to help people and generate income, it’s such a simple cost-effective mode of transport. Amateur cycling was when I started to develop a cycling passion, I was 13 and doing time trials. I moved into mountain biking and started working in a bike shop at 15 and stayed attached to the cycling sector ever since. Aside from the practical everyday use cycling gives you, it can also push your mental and physical limitations. A great example of this is the Paris-Brest-Paris, the oldest cycling event in the world, its 1200 KM. You try to complete it against a non-stop countdown of 90 hours. It’s amazing what you can endure and the limits you overcome when you have. I’ve completed two and am looking to do my third when it’s held again in 2023.

What’s your role at Bikeworks, what do you do?

I lead on the delivery of our Inclusive Cycling Communities Program, which incorporates our All Ability Clubs, the Ride Side by Side project and our Cycling for Wellbeing program.

Why is cycling important to you?

The feeling of freedom is what makes the bicycle my number one choice for both everyday transport and leisure. I can ride alone or with friends and we can go wherever we like, when we want. I enjoy mountain-biking in the forest at the weekend and when I go abroad, I find that by bicycle is a great way to get to know a city much more quickly than by foot. I also feel safer on a bicycle than any other mode of transport. I want to be able to share that to everyone regardless of their experience or level of ability. 

What’s your role at Bikeworks, what do you do?

I manage and coordinate the RSBS programme, including being a cycle pilot. RSBS is an alternative free cycle journey service for older people, people who have mobility or visual impairments; or those facing social isolation. We use electric assist side-by-side cycles to help people go shopping, visit friends, benefiting both their physical and mental health.

Why is cycling important to you?

I honestly think cycles are the best invention for so many reasons: practical, mental health, physical health, and pure joy. A bike can transport you to the shops and carry your shopping home for you, it can take you to work, to your friend’s house, round the park, down canal paths or country lanes, over mountains or even across a continent. It brings me so much joy to see the happy expressions of people riding around London and particularly of those that have just learned how to ride.

To quote a lady I taught many years ago who got on a bike after 30 years “I feel like I’m flying!” Cycling is for everyone, and everyone must be given the opportunity to experience the joy. There are no age or mobility barriers as the RSBS programme has shown us. Ask Irene, aged 92, she said, “I enjoyed it, my little feet were going like pistons.”

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